Good reading in International Security journal | Power & Policy

 

International Security Journal

International Security

By Diane J. McCree

Managing Editor, International Security

In the lead article of the 2010/11 winter issue of International Security, America’s premier journal on security issues, David Lake examines explanations for the outbreak of the 2003 Iraq War, one of the first truly preventive wars in history. He identifies analytical lessons learned in an effort to better understand how states may avoid war in the future.

Thomas Hegghammer probes the dramatic increase in the number of transnational war volunteers in the Muslim world since 1980. Hegghammer relies on a new data set on foreign fighter mobilizations, rare sources in Arabic, and interviews with former activists.

U.S. Marines ride in amphibious vehicles through Saadah, Iraq, eight miles from Syria, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2005. (AP Photo)

U.S. Marines ride in amphibious vehicles through Saadah, Iraq, eight miles from Syria, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2005. (AP Photo)

Decades after the end of the Vietnam War, scholars continue to debate who was responsible for the U.S. defeat and why. James McAllister challenges Jonathan Caverley’s findings, published in the winter 2009/10 issue of International Security, that the Johnson administration opted for a capital-intensive counterinsurgency strategy because it was more politically popular than a labor-intensive strategy. Johnson made this decision despite knowing that a capital-intensive campaign had lower prospects for victory. Caverley responds to McAllister’s criticisms.

The issue closes with Evan Resnick’s investigation of the role of “alliances of convenience” in international relations. Resnick uses the case of the United States’ alliance of convenience with Saddam Hussein’s regime in the 1989–88 Iran-Iraq War to evaluate the usefulness of such alliances.

The quarterly International Security journal was founded in 1976, and is sponsored and edited by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and published by The MIT Press.

 

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Gary Locke | Power & Policy

Tag Archives: Gary Locke

Blame China, not the U.S., for the Plight of Chen Guangcheng

The dramatic events in Beijing surrounding the brave Chinese dissident, Chen Guangcheng, are confounding and hard to fathom at such a great distance and without all the facts. That has not stopped critics who should know better from rushing to blame the Obama Administration for having mishandled negotiations with the Chinese authorities over his fate.

It is irresponsible to second guess Washington when we don’t know the full story. Instead, the true culprit in this fascinating and increasingly tragic drama is the usual suspect–China’s authoritarian government. China has hounded and mistreated Chen and his family for years. Beijing is now trying to intimidate him when he is beyond the protection of the American embassy. None of this is surprising given China’s lamentable human rights record and its shameful status as the world’s greatest human rights abuser. It was also standard Chinese practice to demand a U.S. apology for harboring Chen, an apology that will surely not be forthcoming. Continue reading >

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Iraq | Power & Policy

Tag Archives: Iraq

Iraq: Would we choose war again?

By Graham Allison If we had known then what we know now, would we choose war again? In the real world, foreign policy-making often requires hard choices, sometimes between bad and worse.  After the fact, even the most objective analysts … Continue reading >

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After pullout, U.S preferences in Iraq have become hopes

By Monica Duffy Toft President Obama and his Secretary of Defense have declared the war in Iraq to be “over.” An end to the war is a good thing no doubt, but beyond that, what should we expect and why? … Continue reading >

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Gadhafi’s End: Libya’s Beginning?

By Monica Duffy Toft It has been a long time since bitter enemies were able to imagine each other as truly human; as the servants of narrow or other interests rather than as pathologically homicidal “wolves,” unworthy of quarter. But … Continue reading >

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Gadhafi’s death: A message to Arab youth, and old dictators

By Ashraf Hegazy Executive Director, Dubai Initiative, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs The death of Muammar Gadhafi, as well as that of his son and his closest advisor, in addition to the fall of Sirte, allows the Transitional … Continue reading >

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Counting the costs of the response to 9/11

The Power Problem: Part of a series of views on lessons learned in the exercise of American power in the decade since 9/11. By David E. Sanger Chief Washington Correspondent, The New York Times; Senior Fellow, National Security and the … Continue reading >

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The Economic Fallout from 9/11

The Power Problem: Second in a series of views on lessons learned in the exercise of American power in the decade since 9/11. By Linda J. Bilmes The US response to 9/11 has been a major contributor to America’s current … Continue reading >

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Lessons learned since 9/11: Narratives matter

Was 9/11 a turning point in world history? It is too soon to be tell. After all, the lessons of World War I looked very different in 1939 than they did a mere decade after 1918.

As I argue in The Future of Power, one of the great powers shifts of this century is the increased empowerment of non-state actors, and 9/11 was a dramatic illustration of this long term trend. In 2001 an attack by non-state actors killed more Americans than a government attack did at Pearl Harbor in 1941. But this “privatization of war” was occurring before 9/11 and some American government reports in the 1990s even warned it was coming.

The long-term effect of 9/11 depends on how the United States reacts and the lessons it has learned. In the short term of the past decade, the US has learned to take the new threat seriously and has improved its security procedures and been able to prevent a recurrence of 9/11. All that is to the good.

World Trade Center memorial lights (Photo by John Franco)
World Trade Center memorial lights (Photo by John Franco)

But there is a larger question about terrorism. Continue reading >

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AGE OF HEROES – IN MEMORIAM

By Rolf Mowatt-Larssen Belfer Center Senior Fellow I recently saw a great flick entitled “Age of Heroes.” It is about the early days of the British SAS in World War II. A team of 8 commandos was airlifted covertly into … Continue reading >

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Eight lessons for Obama from Iraq and Afghanistan

Last week, President Obama made a compelling case for why he authorized force in Libya.  In doing so, he sought to assure the American people that this intervention was prudent and bore no resemblance to the controversial and costly wars … Continue reading >

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Good reading in International Security journal

By Diane J. McCree Managing Editor, International Security In the lead article of the 2010/11 winter issue of International Security, America’s premier journal on security issues, David Lake examines explanations for the outbreak of the 2003 Iraq War, one of … Continue reading >

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trade | Power & Policy

Tag Archives: trade

Can Chinese Market Reforms Help American Companies?

By Ben W. Heineman, Jr. (This article first appeared on TheAtlantic.com, where Ben Heineman is a frequent contributor) At the recent Third Plenum political gathering, the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) made headlines around the world by committing to a greater … Continue reading >

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Obama plows new ground in Africa

By Calestous Juma Professor of the Practice of International Development, Harvard Kennedy School; Director, Science, Technology, and Globalization Project, Belfer Center; Principal Investigator, Agricultural Innovation in Africa Project, author of The New Harvest: Agricultural Innovation in Africa. Many analysts viewed … Continue reading >

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Name the Trade Rep, Mr. President

Ben W. Heineman, Jr.
Ben W. Heineman, Jr.

By Ben W. Heineman, Jr.

(This article first appeared in Harvard Business Review Blog Network, where Ben Heineman is a frequent contributor)

In President Obama’s second term, the United States has an ambitious and challenging Atlantic and Pacific trade agenda which could significantly alter the architecture of the global economy.

But the President has yet to designate someone to fill the crucial Cabinet level position of U.S. Trade Representative (USTR). The stakes, both internationally and domestically, are extremely high and Mr. Obama should immediately send to the Senate for confirmation a nominee of prominence and stature.

Doing so would show that he places the highest priority on both the Trans-Pacific Partnership (TPP) negotiations — started in 2011 and slated to end this year — and the newly launched free trade negotiations between the US and EU which are scheduled (optimistically) to be completed before the 2016 election. He should simultaneously push hard for Congressional renewal of Trade Promotion Authority (TPA) which gives the Executive the power to negotiate trade agreements subject only to a prompt up or down vote in the House and Senate with no amendments. This authority expired in 2007. Continue reading >

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Losar | Power & Policy

Tag Archives: Losar

Americans can help protect Tibetan rights

By Andrea Strimling Yodsampa Research Fellow, International Security Program, Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, Harvard Kennedy School In a dramatic contrast to the festivities welcoming the Chinese New Year, Tibetans in Boston and across the globe have refused … Continue reading >

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