Good reading in International Security journal | Power & Policy

 

International Security Journal

International Security

By Diane J. McCree

Managing Editor, International Security

In the lead article of the 2010/11 winter issue of International Security, America’s premier journal on security issues, David Lake examines explanations for the outbreak of the 2003 Iraq War, one of the first truly preventive wars in history. He identifies analytical lessons learned in an effort to better understand how states may avoid war in the future.

Thomas Hegghammer probes the dramatic increase in the number of transnational war volunteers in the Muslim world since 1980. Hegghammer relies on a new data set on foreign fighter mobilizations, rare sources in Arabic, and interviews with former activists.

U.S. Marines ride in amphibious vehicles through Saadah, Iraq, eight miles from Syria, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2005. (AP Photo)

U.S. Marines ride in amphibious vehicles through Saadah, Iraq, eight miles from Syria, Wednesday, Nov. 30, 2005. (AP Photo)

Decades after the end of the Vietnam War, scholars continue to debate who was responsible for the U.S. defeat and why. James McAllister challenges Jonathan Caverley’s findings, published in the winter 2009/10 issue of International Security, that the Johnson administration opted for a capital-intensive counterinsurgency strategy because it was more politically popular than a labor-intensive strategy. Johnson made this decision despite knowing that a capital-intensive campaign had lower prospects for victory. Caverley responds to McAllister’s criticisms.

The issue closes with Evan Resnick’s investigation of the role of “alliances of convenience” in international relations. Resnick uses the case of the United States’ alliance of convenience with Saddam Hussein’s regime in the 1989–88 Iran-Iraq War to evaluate the usefulness of such alliances.

The quarterly International Security journal was founded in 1976, and is sponsored and edited by the Belfer Center for Science and International Affairs, and published by The MIT Press.

 

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